Saturday, October 27, 2012

The Sociologic need for “The Roswell Myth”

Copyright 2012, InterAmerica, Inc.

When a brief shining moment of societal importance – an alleged capture of an extraterrestrial machine – occurred near Roswell, New Mexico in July 1947, the population of the area thought they finally had garnered the recognition that had been passing them by.

After all, other places in America were being lauded and talked about, for being industrious, beautiful, or exploited by visitors – New York City, Los Angeles, Miami, et al.

The ho-hum areas of New Mexico – Corona, Roswell, Las Cruces, even Albuquerque – were Immune to public adoration; but Roswell/Corona much more so than most New Mexican towns and cities.

When the 1947 hubbub occurred, the citizens of Roswell/Corona were entranced by the thought they were finally being noticed by the world at large.

Unfortunately, the instant depreciation of the captured flying disc report by the United States Army deflated any possibility of a Roswell/Corona heyday. The citizenry was crushed.

They went back to their humdrum existences, feeling thwarted by the Army which took away their moment(s) in the sun.

But then along came a UFO buff, Stanton Friedman, in 1978, who offered a resurrection of that missed glory of 1947, and the residue of Roswellian wannabes grabbed the opportunity and beheld the extraterrestrial gospel of Mr. Friedman, with the hope that the world would now see their humble society as worthy of visitation, by visitors from outer space, who knew a great venue when they found one.

All the years of solitude and loneliness was taken away by Mr. Friedman and his UFO acolytes.

The Roswell citizens were not about to lose their new found cachet so they bolstered the imaginings of UFO believers with embellishments that were little different than those of the early Greeks or Egyptians who promoted their countries and cultures with mythical tales that made their habitations seem worthy of visit and encomiums.

The ploy worked and Roswell became a place of tainted honor for many and maintains that place of honor to this day.

The myth of a Roswell flying machine with “tourists” crashing nearby has been expanded creatively since 1978 and those old-timers, and their generational newbies, swell with pride that their inhabited part of the world is as important – maybe more so – than others.

The citizens, past and present, were blessed by a special visitation that rivals the descent of God upon the ancient Hebrews.

Thus, Roswell continues to resonate – among a few UFO devotees only – but it’s a resonation that can’t be allowed to be quelled, not this time.

RR

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

The Paglen Pictures – But where are the UFO/ET Pictures?


The October 22nd, 2012 New Yorker magazine had a profile of Trevor Paglen by Jonah Wiener [Prying Eyes, Page 54 ff.]

Mr. Paglen is a fellow who is noted for his artistic photographs of highly secret places like Area 51.

Mr. Paglen hopes to enlighten the population about such clandestine venues by making aesthetic images of those venues.

I don’t get the point exactly but found an effort by Mr. Paglen to be worthy of extrapolation.

That effort is this: Mr. Paglen has gathered a group of images that he, along with help of researchers at MIT and astronomer Joel Weisberg, will be launched on a satellite, the Echostar XVI, late in 2012.

The intent is to provide the images, called The Last Pictures, for intergalactic aliens.

This is similar to the images that Carl Sagan helped create and gather for Voyager 1 which is at the outer edges of the Solar System and meant to enlighten galactic civilizations about the Earth and its inhabitants.

These “notes in a bottle” are interesting and projective; that is, they assume that life exists in the Universe and that life will find the images informative about another existence, us.

But questions arise…

If there is life elsewhere, why hasn’t it tried to communicate with us, via such imaged projectiles or something similar?

After all, UFO ET advocates would have us believe that flying saucers contain thinking humanoids.

And haven’t UFOs and their witnessed occupants mimicked humanity, in clothing and appearance, even appurtenances (such as belts, weaponry, footwear, helmets, et cetera)?

Even UFOs or flying saucers haven’t been more exotic than Earth’s aircraft designs.

So there would seem to be a similar engineering mind-set at work in the UFO phenomenon.

But even without UFO entities like us, science thinks that galactic civilizations would have the same mathematical sensibilities as our own, or even an evolved mental (or societal) ability not unlike ours so they would understand the images attached to Voyager 1 or Paglen’s satellite insertions.

Implicit in the Paglen and Sagan thrusts lies a belief that life isn’t unique to Earth.

But science refuses to accept visitations here from those outer lives.

And UFO buffs have got to ask themselves why UFO occupants haven’t tried to provide images of their cultures or civilizations.

That is one of the enduring mysteries of the UFO phenomenon: the lack of identification.

Your thoughts?

RR